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African Black Soap The original soap of the Yoruba people of Nigeria. It is all natural with no additives or preservatives. It has been used to help speed the healing of various skin problems for hundreds of years.

African Black Soap is called "Ose dudu", "Alata", or "Anago" in West Africa. Traditional African Black Soap is an ancient product that is used and cherished in homes throughout Africa.

Traditional African Black Soap deep cleanses and exfoliates dead skin cells to reveal fresh and clean skin. The Traditional African Black Soap produces a thick, soft lather. It is moisturizing, yet not oily. Traditional African Black Soap will leave your skin soft, smooth and clean.

Uses: For Acne, Blemishes, Eczema, Psoriasis, Rashes, Dandruffs, Razor Bumps, and Ringworm

Raw Cocoa Butter

Cocoa butter, also called cacao butter, is the cream-colored fat extracted from cacao seeds (cocoa beans) and used to add flavor, scent, and smoothness to chocolate, cosmetics, tanning oil, soap, and a multitude of topical lotions and creams. Cocoa butter has been called the ultimate moisturizer, and has been used to keep skin soft and supple for centuries. It is one of the most stable, highly concentrated natural fats known, and melts at body temperature so that it is readily absorbed into the skin. Cocoa butter is often recommended for treatment of skin conditions such as eczema and dermatitis. When applied topically, it creates a barrier between sensitive skin and the environment and also helps retain moisture. In addition, cocoa butter contains cocoa mass polyphenol (CMP), a substance that inhibits the production of the immuno globulin IgE. IgE is known to aggravate symptoms of both dermatitis and asthma.

Pregnant women have long used to cocoa butter formulations to prevent and treat stretch marks, but this pleasant-smelling substance is added to countless other topical preparations as well. Lotions and oils containing cocoa butter are often used in aromatherapy massages to promote feelings of relaxation and well-being. Recent research indicates that massaging the skin with cocoa butter may help relieve stress, boost the immune system, and even prevent cancer. This is because cocoa butter, like chocolate, contains a lot of CMP. Researchers in Japan reported that CMP inhibits the growth of cancerous cells and tumors by reducing active oxygen levels in the body, and concluded that CMP inhibits the oxidation of LDL (good) cholesterol and the production of inflammatory cells; there is some evidence that the CMP in cocoa butter may also help prevent heart disease and ease arthritic symptoms.

Preliminary research indicates that CMP actually helps suppress excessive T-cell activity in the immune system, which could help treat conditions associated with overactive immune systems, such as psoriasis, fibromyalgia, and chronic fatigue syndrome.

Cocoa butter is found in chocolate of course, and as previously stated, is an ingredient in countless topical preparations. You can also buy pure cocoa butter at pharmacies, health food stores, and from online distributorships. There have been rare cases of sensitive individuals having skin reactions to this substance. If you notice any rash or discomfort, simply discontinue use of this product.


Raw Shea Butter

Known as Karite Butter, is a cream-colored fatty substance made from the nuts of Karite nut trees (also called Mangifolia trees) that grow in the Savannah regions of West and Central Africa. Karite trees, or Shea trees, are not cultivated. They grow only in the wild, and can take up to 50 years to mature (they live up to 300 years!). In most parts of West Africa, destruction of the shea tree is prohibited because this little nut provides a valuable source of food, medicine, and income for the population. In fact, shea butter is sometimes referred to as womens gold in Africa, because so many women are employed in the production of shea butter.

Why is Shea butter in such demand? Western countries are just beginning to recognize the considerable health and beauty benefits of Shea butter, something Africans have known for thousands of years. Shea butter has been used to help heal burns, sores, scars, dermatitis, psoriasis, dandruff, and stretch marks. It may also help diminish wrinkles by moisturizing the skin, promoting cell renewal, and increasing circulation. Shea butter also contains cinnamic acid, a substance that helps protect the skin from harmful UV rays.

Shea butter is a particularly effective moisturizer because contains so many fatty acids, which are needed to retain skin moisture and elasticity. The high fatty acid content of shea butter also makes it an excellent additive to soap, shampoos, anti-aging creams, cosmetics, lotions, and massage oilsits soft, butter-like texture melts readily into the skin.

Shea butter protects the skin from both environmental and free-radical damage. It contains vitamins A and E, and has demonstrated both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties.

Shea butter is already added to many cosmetic products, but you can also purchase 100 percent pure shea butter at most health food stores and from online distributors. Unrefined shea butter is superior in that it retains all its natural vitamins, especially vitamin A and vitamin E. However, the natural smell of shea can be a bit off-putting (stinky), though the aroma does disappear after it has been applied to your skin within minutes. You can also buy ultra-refined and refined Shea butter. Both of these types are have a more pleasing scent, color, and consistency, although the refining process may diminish the vitamin potency.

Many stores sell Shea butter in various sizes, containers, prices, and types, but make sure to do your research before buying themnot all Shea butter products are created equal, and some products contain a significant amount of potentially irritating additives and very little real shea butter. That said, one hundred percent natural shea butter is a handy thing to have around the house. It can be used as an all-natural hair conditioner, moisturizer, and makeup remover, or as a treatment for burns, cuts, scrapes, sunburns, and diaper rash. Shea butter may also help treat skin problems such as eczema and psoriasis; however, keep in mind that you should always consult a physician or dermatologist about serious or persistent skin problems. Shea butter is not recommended for people with nut or latex allergies.
Last Updated: 7 Sep 2012 11:48:30 PDT home  |  about  |  terms  |  contact
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